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Two-thirds of Americans believe they have become a better person this year

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The bleakness and difficulty of 2020 have become something of an ongoing joke in our global discourse. With COVID-19, Donald Trump in office, wildfires raging, police brutality, and so many other challenges, it can be hard to imagine how things could get much worse.

But it appears that this bleakness and difficulty have been both highly constructive and illuminating. A new poll of 2,000 Americans – commissioned by Coravin and conducted by OnePoll – indicates that two-thirds of Americans believe the troubles of 2020 have made them a better person, while many also believe it has led them to reconsider their priorities in the future.

The survey uncovered several other important findings:

  • 55% admitted to being embarrassed by what they prioritized before the pandemic
  • 46% want to spend more quality time with loved ones
  • 41% want to not take hugs for granted
  • 38% want to create more meaningful personal relationships
  • 35% have found new hobbies they want to continue pursuing even after the pandemic

This year has been among the most difficult I can remember. It feels overwhelming at times. But let’s not confuse difficult and painful with bad. As this poll shows, the difficulty and pain have forced us to reconsider our priorities and values. They have provided us an opportunity to more fully step into who we really are.

What would you need to do now to make 2020 the most important, impactful, and best year of your life?


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Peter Schulte

Peter Schulte is the founder and editor of Kindling. Peter is also Senior Digital Engagement Associate for the Pacific Institute and the UN Global Compact's CEO Water Mandate, connecting businesses to sustainable water practices. Peter holds a B.S. in Conservation and Resource Studies and a B.A. in Comparative Literature from University of California, Berkeley, and an M.B.A. in Sustainable Systems from Pinchot University. He lives in Bellingham, WA, USA with his wife, son, and cat.

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